Homecoming Moved to the Spring

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The NCHS Student Body dancing the night away in 2019. With social distancing and other COVID-19 restrictions, large dances are not possible at the moment.

Leah Bromagen, Staff Writer

In late September, North Creek High School’s ASB officially moved the date for Homecoming to the month of March, due to the circumstances surrounding COVID-19.

Principal Dr. Eric McDowell and ASB members reached a decision; however, they agree that there are many details yet to be determined.  “All we know is that [homecoming] couldn’t have worked as well if it was in the fall like it normally is. We wanted to shoot for a time that we aren’t as restricted” said ASB President Josh Bissenden.  While March has been chosen as the month to hold the annual homecoming dance, he also said that a specific date has yet to be agreed upon.

It is apparent that safety is the most important factor in this decision.  “If we were to have thrown a homecoming so many people would be in the same room.  Social distancing would not be happening and throwing it could have infected so many people with COVID,” said Committee Chair Afsoon Salehpour. Dr. McDowell and Bissenden agree. 

Key factors include student and staff safety as we do not know when vaccines or treatments will be widely available so that we can return to campus,” said Dr. McDowell.  However, Dr. McDowell also alluded to other factors that went into announcing a postponement instead of a complete cancellation.  “I think the ASB Exec Board wanted to keep Homecoming in some fashion… I think they wanted to keep hope alive,” he said.

Despite the concern for safety and ASB members’ attempts to keep spirits up, some students, including Bissenden and Salehpour, have planned or participated in their own homecomings outside of school.  “We wanted to shoot for the most normal year possible and so dressing up with some friends, around when homecoming would usually be held, calling it a “fake homecoming” or “foco”, just sounded like lots of fun and something we could do safely,” said Bissenden. 

 Salehpour had similar sentiments.  “Homecoming is personally my favorite part of the year, but I love it because it’s just a time where I can hang out with my friends, dance, party, and just have fun and not be stressed,” she said.  Salehpour, Bissenden, and many other students at North Creek feel that homecoming is a beacon of fun and joy, as well as a symbol of normalcy, especially in these difficult times.

ASB Members Afsoon Salehpour and Josh Bissenden at their Fall 2020 homecoming. Some students held similar ‘focos’ to keep the spirit of homecoming alive this unprecedented school year.

However, there are large concerns regarding the lack of social distancing taking place during these “focos” (see photo).  Both parents and teachers are beginning to question whether they can trust the student body to be safe, when it’s apparent that social distancing and masks have been discarded in the midst of this pandemic.  “Seeing how these kids are acting outside of school makes me wonder if I can send my child to something like a school dance in good faith,” said parent Jennifer Bromagen.  Until all students can demonstrate safe behaviors outside the classroom, it’s unlikely that homecoming will be held any time soon.